Pont Llanelltyd

While my son and grandson were skimming stone a wee bit downstream from here on our recent holiday to North Wales, I made some photos of the ancient bridge. This is the one I like best.

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No 12 “Joan”

No 12 “Joan” is an engine on the Welshpool & Llanfair Light Railway. No 12 “Joan” is also named for my maternal grandmother, Joan Mildred Simmons (nee Henzell) and was one of a number of steam engines which were used to haul sugar cane to the factory on Antigua. I visited the WLLR on their recent steam gala and was lucky enough to ride on the footplate on a scheduled service.

To find out more about this rather wonderful heritage railway, visit www.wllr.org.uk. To enjoy the trains, visit the railway!

Keills Port South Quay

Keills Port South Quay

At the end of the peninsula south of Tayvallich lies the little-used Keills Port. This slipway is the still-operational South Quay and maintained by Argyll and Bute Council. The gated road to the quay is a public road its full length and, contrary to the signs, it is possible to turn a vehicle at the quay end. That said, the best approach is on foot or bicycle to maintain the tranquility of the place. This was once busy with traffic from the Isle of Jura, which lies across the sound. Seals and otters can be seen here and the slipway itself is covered with sea pinks in the spring.

The quay was built in 1821 on the orders of the Parliamentary Commissioners for Highland Roads and Bridges and is attributed to Thomas Telford.

Canmore.